Comparing the 5 Boroughs of NYC

Sunset over Manhattan from Top of the Rock

Any NYC native knows that each of the five boroughs of the city have it’s own individual flavor – from the street life, to amenities, and general ambience, moods can shift in a matter of blocks. Tenants of every borough would stand for their own at any day of the week – down to pride for the individual neighborhood, official or unofficial. With every borough having it’s own strengths and weaknesses, it’s good to compare them all to have more of an understanding of what moving there entails. If you’re looking to move to Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, the Bronx, or Staten Island, this information is sure to set you on the right path.

Brooklyn

A very large borough, Brooklyn is almost like a city of it’s own (in fact it was at one time!) Brooklyn has experienced a real-estate shift in recent years, seeing increased gentrification and price increases. However deals on fantastic apartments can be found with a much greater square feet to price ratio than those in Manhattan; and tons of neighborhoods with different flavors abound. From Prospect Heights, and Greenpoint to Park Slope and Williamsburg, Brooklyn offers everything culturally that a city could – performance venues, shopping, restaurants, art galleries, and beautiful parks. Not to mention tree lined streets, a broad sense of sky, and a fantastic community dedicated to the economic and social well-being of their place of life.

 

Manhattan

The most famous and instantly recognizable bastion of New York City for the entire world, Manhattan is a major attraction for tourists and new residents, who know it as one of, if not the most iconic cities on Earth. Manhattan, while walkable, seems to contain a universe of different communities. From art and design, to shopping, commerce, and entertainment, Manhattan offers something for every single kind of mover. From the quaint picturesque charm of the West Village to the family friendly sprawl of the Upper East and Upper West sides, Manhattan is an ideal place to move for those who want to live the center of it all.

 

Queens

The biggest of the boroughs in sheer scale and sprawl, Queens is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the entire world – over 48 percent of its residents were born in a foreign country. Queens’ massive size amounts to if offering  a large range of housing options, from newly built high rise condos to areas that feel completely suburban.  Although it boasts a hefty commute to Manhattan, Queens prices are usually somewhat lower than those in Brooklyn or the main island.

The Bronx

Once one of the most institutionally overlooked and economically troubled areas of New York City, the Bronx has experienced a monetary revitalization since the 1990s, leading to new construction and the gentrification of certain areas. Government initiatives to support affordable housing has led to an increase in new tenants moving into the area, increasing a public awareness of the importance of community solidarity and healthy neighborhood life.

 

Staten Island

Staten Island is a way of living in New York City without feeling like you live in New York City – akin to some of the more suburban feeling neighborhoods of Queens, Staten Island almost feels like you’re not in a city at all. It has the open space and neighborhood feeling that is hard to get in other places in the city – if you work in Brooklyn or Manhattan the ferry or bridge commute will take some time, but if you’re settling down with a family it might be worth investigating.

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Comparing the 5 Boroughs of NYC

Sunset over Manhattan from Top of the Rock

Any NYC native knows that each of the five boroughs of the city have it’s own individual flavor – from the street life, to amenities, and general ambience, moods can shift in a matter of blocks. Tenants of every borough would stand for their own at any day of the week – down to pride for the individual neighborhood, official or unofficial. With every borough having it’s own strengths and weaknesses, it’s good to compare them all to have more of an understanding of what moving there entails. If you’re looking to move to Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, the Bronx, or Staten Island, this information is sure to set you on the right path.

Brooklyn

A very large borough, Brooklyn is almost like a city of it’s own (in fact it was at one time!) Brooklyn has experienced a real-estate shift in recent years, seeing increased gentrification and price increases. However deals on fantastic apartments can be found with a much greater square feet to price ratio than those in Manhattan; and tons of neighborhoods with different flavors abound. From Prospect Heights, and Greenpoint to Park Slope and Williamsburg, Brooklyn offers everything culturally that a city could – performance venues, shopping, restaurants, art galleries, and beautiful parks. Not to mention tree lined streets, a broad sense of sky, and a fantastic community dedicated to the economic and social well-being of their place of life.

 

Manhattan

The most famous and instantly recognizable bastion of New York City for the entire world, Manhattan is a major attraction for tourists and new residents, who know it as one of, if not the most iconic cities on Earth. Manhattan, while walkable, seems to contain a universe of different communities. From art and design, to shopping, commerce, and entertainment, Manhattan offers something for every single kind of mover. From the quaint picturesque charm of the West Village to the family friendly sprawl of the Upper East and Upper West sides, Manhattan is an ideal place to move for those who want to live the center of it all.

 

Queens

The biggest of the boroughs in sheer scale and sprawl, Queens is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the entire world – over 48 percent of its residents were born in a foreign country. Queens’ massive size amounts to if offering  a large range of housing options, from newly built high rise condos to areas that feel completely suburban.  Although it boasts a hefty commute to Manhattan, Queens prices are usually somewhat lower than those in Brooklyn or the main island.

The Bronx

Once one of the most institutionally overlooked and economically troubled areas of New York City, the Bronx has experienced a monetary revitalization since the 1990s, leading to new construction and the gentrification of certain areas. Government initiatives to support affordable housing has led to an increase in new tenants moving into the area, increasing a public awareness of the importance of community solidarity and healthy neighborhood life.

 

Staten Island

Staten Island is a way of living in New York City without feeling like you live in New York City – akin to some of the more suburban feeling neighborhoods of Queens, Staten Island almost feels like you’re not in a city at all. It has the open space and neighborhood feeling that is hard to get in other places in the city – if you work in Brooklyn or Manhattan the ferry or bridge commute will take some time, but if you’re settling down with a family it might be worth investigating.

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